Master Gardeners of Ontario Inc.

Motivating and Inspiring Gardeners in Ontario

Sidebar
Menu

Master Gardeners in a Class of Their Own

master_gardener

by Mark and Ben Cullen - Toronto Star, November 11, 2017

When it comes to cultivating passion, energy and talent, Canada’s Master Gardeners are standouts.

Master Gardeners are dedicated to the art and science of gardening. And, with their generosity of knowledge and time — on public garden tours, at local horticulture societies, at small shows and big ones such as Canada Blooms and in various online forums — they help sustain a broader community of Canadian gardeners...

read more

Technical Update: Toronto MG's & Toronto Botanical

Growing Food from Around the World

Date: Saturday, January 13, 2018

Speakers for the day include:
Dena Jackson Toronto comedian & MC A Light-hearted Look at Growing Food from Around the World

Conrad Richter President of Richters Herbs Welcoming Migrant Herbs to our Gardens

Viliam Zvalo research scientist, Vineland Research Station New Plants in Familiar Places...the Science

Ken Brown horticulturist, writer & home gardener Down to Earth Solutions for Growing Unusual Edibles

more information

Canada's National Flower - Bunchberry

nationalflower-winnner

The votes are in! Canadians have spoken!

A nation-wide contest to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary, sponsored by Master Gardeners of Ontario, has embraced the bunchberry, known as quatre–temps in French and kawiscowimin in Cree, as the winner.

Since the beginning of the National Flower Contest, the little white flower has held the lead with an average of 80 per cent of the on-line vote. Since it was announced in March, almost 10,000 Canadians took up the challenge to help select our national flower.

Master Gardeners of Ontario will submit an online petition to Parliament to have the winner declared Canada’s official National Flower, says Maureen Hulbert who spearheaded the project: "We all love to celebrate the wildness of Canada and its varied areas and having something that can actually grow in every part of the country pulls us together". (photo credit Todd Boland)

Sign the Petition

Wild Parsnip - How to Identify

wild-parsnips

Can you identify Wild Parsnip?

read more

St. Marys Garden Fair - June 3rd

Garden Fair

Celebrating the 20th year for this amazing event! Enjoy a wide variety of garden related vendors in an outdoor park setting. Discover everything from hanging baskets to birdhouses, unique perennials, annuals, shrubs & interesting garden décor. Our very popular heirloom tomatoes will be for sale, grown by our Horticultural members. Free admission, refreshments on site and lots of free parking.

Date: June 3, 2017 -- 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Location: Milt Dunnell Field (The Flats) – Water St. North St.Marys, ON

Contact Name: Ron Hunter

Contact Phone # 519-284-2382

Contact email address: rbhunter@hotmail.com

Vote for Canada's National Flower


3 flowers plus banner

Read about the three 'nominees' and then vote using the Survey Monkey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8Z9WDW9

What’s the National Flower of Canada?

We have an official tree - the maple, but we do NOT have an official flower! Master Gardeners of Ontario thinks Canada’s 150th birthday is the perfect time to launch a campaign to get one!

Toronto Master Gardeners with help from Todd Boland, Research Horticulturist at Memorial University of Newfoundland, came up with the following three choices for a pan-Canadian flower - one that appears in every province and territory but is not already a provincial or territorial emblem:

Hooded Ladies Tresses (Spiranthes romanzoffiana)
· Unique spiraling flower spike marks this genus
· Found in open wet areas – meadows, bogs, marshes
· Fragrant flowers from July to Sept on 10 to 50 cm stems
· Food source for native bumblebees all through summer

Twinflower (Linnaea borealis)
· Delicate but tough! “borealis” – of the north
· Found in forests, wetlands all over Canada
· Reproduces mainly by spreading stolons
· Fragrant flowers on 15 cm stems for one week in June, attract native bees
· Winter forage for caribou

Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
· Changes with the seasons - just like Canada!
· White flowers in spring, red berries in summer, great red-purple fall colour
· Very common in forests and wetlands all over Canada
· Creeping form, 10 to 20 cm tall, great as a native groundcover
· Pollinators include native bumblebees and solitary bees
· Berries are food source for small and large mammals, migratory birds
· Winter forage source for caribou, moose, elk, deer

Voting will close at midnight on June 30th, 2017

Vote now-it only takes a few seconds using this Survey Monkey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8Z9WDW9

Technical Update Toronto MGs

Gardening Without Chemicals

Saturday, January 7, 2017 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

Keynote Speaker: Mark Cullen

more information

registration form

MGOI Annual Report 2015

The 2015 Annual Report is online here.